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The MARK
of the
BEAST

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Beloved of the Lord;

Thus, it is written: And the light of a candle shall shine no more at all in thee: and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee: for thy Merchants-ἔμποροί (emporoi)-a trader, (a (wholesale) tradesman, dealer:—merchant) were the great men of the earth: for by-ἐν (en)-in) thy sorceries-φαρμακείᾳ (pharmakeia)-enchantment with drugs, (i.e. the use or the administering of drugs:—medication ("pharmacy"); (by extension:— magic) were all-πάντα (panta)-all, every, the whole) nations-ἔθνη (ethen)-nation, people) deceived-ἐπλανήθησαν (eplanethesan)-to lead astray, to (properly, cause to) roam (from safety, truth, or virtue):—go astray, deceive, err, seduce, wander, be out of the way.). -(Revelation 18:23)

1. The Mark part.1

 

Pharmakeia

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Bibles:

 

Authorized Version 1611 [Punctuation, Capitalization, & Italics]

&

King James Bible 1769 [Spelling]

Concordance / Lexicon:

  • Analytical Concordance to the Bible: Robert Young, 1880.

  • The New Strong's Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible.

  • Thayer's Greek Lexicon.

  • Friberg Analytical Greek Lexicon

  • Gingrich, Greek New Testament Lexicon

  • Danker, Greek New Testament Lexicon

Greek Text:

Stephanus 1550 & Beza's 1598 & Scrivener's 1894 Textus Receptus.

Key:

  •  G#### : Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number:— used when comparing  Greek words that share the same Root Word, but not the same Inflection / Parsing.

  • Open Bracket [(abc)] : My commentary insert/input.

Commentaries:

  • StudyLight.org: SL (click)

  • BibleHub.com: BH (click)

Greek Interlinear:

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The verse in question: 

 

 

 

 

 

Scrivener's Textus Receptus 1894

16 καὶ ποιεῖ πάντας, τοὺς μικροὺς καὶ τοὺς μεγάλους, καὶ τοὺς πλουσίους καὶ τοὺς πτωχούς, καὶ τοὺς ἐλευθέρους καὶ τοὺς δούλους, ἵνα δώσῃ αὐτοῖς χάραγμα ἐπὶ τῆς χειρὸς αὐτῶν τῆς δεξιᾶς, ἐπὶ τῶν μέτωπων αὐτῶν, 17 καὶ ἵνα μή τις δύνηται ἀγοράσαι πωλῆσαι, εἰ μὴ ἔχων τὸ χάραγμα, τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ θηρίου τὸν ἀριθμὸν τοῦ ὀνόματος αὐτοῦ.

Revelation 13:15-17

15 And he had power to give //life (Gr. breath) unto the Image of the beast, that the Image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the Image of the beast, should be killed. 16 And-καί (kai)-and, also) he causeth-ποιεῖ (poiei)-to do, make, (to cause one to)) all-πάντας (pantas)-all, every, the whole), *both small-μικροὺς (mikrous)-little, small, short, (apparently a primary word; small (in size, quantity, number or (figuratively) dignity):—least, less, little, small) and-καὶ (kai)-and, also) great-μεγάλους (megalous)-great, (big (literally or figuratively, in a very wide application):—great(-est), mighty, strong)) *rich-πλουσίους (plousious)-rich, (properly: wealthy; figuratively, abounding with:—rich) and *poor-πτωχούς (ptochous)-trembling, poor, (i.e. poor, needy)), *free-ἐλευθέρους (eleutherous)-free, at liberty, (i.e. one who is not a slave) and *bond-δούλους (doulous)-slave, servant, (i.e. bondman, man of servile condition), //to-ἵνα (hina)-so that, in order that (denoting the purpose or the result)) receive-δώσῃ (dose)-to give) (Gr. to give) *a mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving) in-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon) their *right-δεξιᾶς (dexias)-right (hand, foot, or side), the right side or (feminine) hand (as that which usually takes):—right (hand, side):—the right)) *hand-χειρὸς (cheiros)-lit. hand), or-(e)-or, either) in-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon) their *foreheads-μέτωπων (metopon)-forehead, between the eyes): 17 And-καὶ (kai)-and, also) that-ἵνα (hina)-in order that, so that) no-μή (me)-no, not) man-τις (tis)-some one, a certain one) might-δύνηται (dunetai)-to be able or possible) *buy-ἀγοράσαι (agorasai)-to use the market place, (properly: to go to market, i.e. (by implication: to purchase)) or- (e)-or, either) *sell-πωλῆσαι (polesai)-to barter, (i.e. to sell)), save he-εἰ μὴ (ei me)-if not, except) that had-ἔχων (echon)-to have) the mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving), or- (e)-or, either) the name of the beast, or the number-ἀριθμὸν (arithmon)-a number (as reckoned up):—number) of his name.

Example of Greek word: 

Greek Interlinear: 

  • he causeth-ποιεῖ: Verb, Present, Active, Indicative, 3rd Person, Singular: And ["it-is-makING"//"it-is-do-causing"] all, both small and great rich and poor, free and bond, to

  • receive-δώσῃVerb, Aorist, Active, Subjunctive, 3rd Person, Singular:  ["it-SHOULD BE-GIVING"] a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: 17 And that no man

  • might-δύνηταιVerb, Present, Middle or Passive Deponent, Subjunctive, 3rd Person, Singular: ["MAY-BE-ABLE"//"may-be-being-able"]

  • buy-ἀγοράσαιVerb, Aorist, Active, Infinitive: ["TO-BUY"] or

  • sell-πωλῆσαι: Verb, Aorist, Active, Infinitive: ["TO-SELL"], save he that

  • had-ἔχων: Verb, Present, Active, Participle, Nominative, Singular, Masculine: ["one-HAVING"] the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

Punctuation Comparison:

1611 AV

16 And he causeth all, both smal and great rich and poore, free and bond, to receiue a marke in their right hand, or in their foreheads: 17 And that no man might buy or sell, saue he that had the marke, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name

 

1769 KJV

16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: 17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

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The Mark

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Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G5480

 

First, I would like to draw your attention to the following two words out of Revelation 13:16-17: (1) "a mark"-G5480 // "mark"-G5480, and (2) "in"-G1909. We will begin by analyzing G5480, which can be found for a total of nine (9) times in the New Testament. The inflection of G5480 can be found in three different ways:

  • seven (7) times as: χάραγμα (charagma)Noun, Accusative, Singular, Neuter.

  • one (1time as: χαράγματι (charagmati)Noun, Genitive, Singular, Neuter

  • one (1) time as: χαράγματος (charagmatos)Noun, Dative, Singular, Neuter.

 

definition of each Greek case:

The Accusative case: The accusative case refers to the case used for a noun or pronoun that is a direct object. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

 

The Genitive case: The genitive case refers to the case used for a noun, pronoun, or adjective to show ownership. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

The Dative case: The dative case shows the relationship of an indirect object to a verb, often found inside a prepositional phrase. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

  • The Greek word: χάραγμα (charagma)-G5480 is found seven (7) times with the Accusative case:

 

The Accusative case: The accusative case refers to the case used for a noun or pronoun that is a direct object. 

E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

Revelation 13:16

“And he causeth all, both small and great rich and poor, free and bond, to receive G5480 a mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:— Accusative case) in their right hand, or in their foreheads:”

Revelation 13:17

“And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had theAccusative case) G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Accusative case), or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.”

Revelation 14:9

“And the third Angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Accusative case) in his forehead, or in his hand,”

Revelation 14:11

“And the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever. And they have no rest day nor night, who worship the beast and his image, and whosoever receiveth theAccusative case) G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Accusative case) of his name.”

Revelation 16:2

“And the first went, and poured out his vial upon the earth, and there fell a noisome and grievous sore upon the men which had theAccusative case) G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Accusative case) of the beast, and upon them which worshipped his image.”

Revelation 19:20

“And the beast was taken, and with him the false prophet, that wrought miracles before him, with which he deceived them that had received theAccusative case) G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:— Accusative case) of the beast, and them that worshipped his image. These both were cast alive into a lake of fire burning with brimstone.”

Revelation 20:4

“And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Accusative case) upon their foreheads, or in their hands, and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years.”

    Note: there is a (definite article-[the]) in the Greek Texts (TR) prior to the word (mark) instead of the word (his). OR,

 ("...[οὐκ-neither] [ἔλαβον-had received] [τὸ-the] [χάραγμα-mark]..."). 

The order of Greek cases is as follows: 

("...[οὐκ-neither] // [ἔλαβον-had received] // [τὸ-the-Accusative// [χάραγμα-mark-Accusative]...")..

  • The Greek word: χαράγματος (charagmatos)-G5480 is found one (1) time with the Genitive case:

The Genitive case: The genitive case refers to the case used for a noun, pronoun, or adjective to show ownership. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

Revelation 15:2

“And I saw as it were a sea of glass, mingled with fire, and them that had gotten the victory over the beast, and over his image, and over his Genitive case) G5480 mark-χαράγματος (charagmatos)-impressed mark, engraving,:—Genitive case), and over the number of his name, stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God.”

  • The Greek word: χαράγματι (charagmati)-G5480 is found one (1) time with the Dative case

 

The Dative case: The dative case shows the relationship of an indirect object to a verb, often found inside a prepositional phrase. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

Acts 17:29

“Forasmuch then as we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stoneDative case) 

G5480 graven-χαράγματι (charagmati)-something graven, sculptured, (i.e. thing carved, sculpture, graven work,:—Dative case) by art, and man's device.”

Greek definitions for: G5480

  • Analytical Concordance to the Bible: Robert Young, 1880: 

    a. impressed mark, engraving Rev. 13:16f, 17; 14:9,11; 15:2; 16:2; 19:20; 20:4 b. something graven, sculptured Acts 17:29.

  • The New Strong's Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible:

a scratch or etching, i.e. stamp (as a badge of servitude), or scupltured figure (statue):—graven, mark.

  • Thayer's Greek Lexicon:

(χαράσσω to engrave); a. a stamp, an imprinted mark: of the mark stamped on the forehead or the right hand as the badge of the followers of Antichrist, Rev. 13:16f; 14:9,11; 15:2 Rec.; 16:2; 19:20; 20:4 (πυρός, the mark branded upon horses, Anacreon (530 B. C.) 26 (55), 2). b. thing carved, sculpture, graven work: of idolatrous images, Acts 17:29. (In various other senses in Greek writings from Sophocles down.) 

  • Friberg, Analytical Greek Lexicon:

(1) mark or stamp, made by engraving, etching, imprinting, branding (RV 13.16); (2) by metonymy likeness, handiwork, the thing formed (AC 17.29)

  • Gingrich Lexicon:

1. a mark or stamp Rv 13:16f; 14:9, 11; 15:2 v.l.; 16:2; 19:20; 20:4.—2. a thing formed, an image Ac 17:29.* [pg 215] 

  • Danker Lexicon:

[χαράσσω ‘engrave’] ‘product of an engraving process’ – a. of a statue engraved work Ac 17:29. – b. of a mark engraved on the human body brand Rv 13:16f; 14:9 , 11; 16:2; 19:20; 20:4.  

Summary.

All of the above verses use G5480. And all of them share a common definition of: to scratch or etch, carve, grave, impress, etcThe proper use of each Greek case (Accusative, Genitive, Dative) depends on the the syntax (syntax refers to the set of rules that determines the arrangement of words in a sentence.) of the text.

Take for example: the Genitive case "his mark"-(i.e. the beast's mark) from Revelation 15:2, we cannot apply the Accusative case here because grammatically it would be incorrect; for the Genitive case denotes ownership, hence, "his mark". Nor can we apply the Genitive case where it is fitting for the Accusative case, such as in Revelation 13:17 ("the mark"-(i.e. the mark of the beast). Nevertheless, both Revelation 15:2 & Revelation 13:17 refer to the same mark.

 

We will now set aside the above information for a moment.

 

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Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G5482

 

Next,  

The Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G5480 is a kin to G5482, which can only be found in one (1) verse: Luke 19:43 as: 

χάρακά (charaka)-a trench). Compare:

Luke 19:43

“For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast G5482 a trench-χάρακά (charaka)-a stake of wood, palisade, rampart, (from χαράσσω charássō (to sharpen to a point; akin to G1125 through the idea of scratching); a stake, i.e. (by implication) a palisade or rampart (military mound for circumvallation in a siege):—trench.) about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,”

    palisade, sometimes called a stakewall or a paling, is typically a fence or defensive wall made from iron or wooden stakes, or tree trunks, and used as a defensive structure or enclosure.

    Etymology: Palisade derives from pale, from the Latin word pālus, meaning stake, specifically a "stake" used to support a fence.[1] A palisade gangs these side by side to create a fence entirely made of pales.-wikipedia

 

    Can you think of any technology that resembles the above? Perhaps, a microneedle vaccine patch? This patches are said to go into the epidermis of the skin; just something to consider. Furthermore, G5482 is a kin to G1125.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G1125

The Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G5482 is akin to G1125; γράφω Gráphō, a root word; a primary verb; to "grave", especially to write. G1125 can be found throughout the New Testament in words like: ("it is written"-gegraptai), ("write"-graphe), ("I write"-grapho), ("to write"-graphein), & co. G1125 is used more than 200 times. It is first used in Matthew 2:5. Compare:

Matthew 2:5

“And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written-γέγραπται (gegraptai)-to be written, (properly: to grave, scrape, inscribe, scratch, engrave; with focus on the physical act of inscribing/writing)) by the Prophet;”

The last use of G1125 can be found in the last Chapter of the Bible:

Revelation 22:19

“And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written-γεγραμμένων (gegrammenon)-to be written, (properly: to grave, scrape, inscribe, scratch, engrave; with focus on the physical act of inscribing/writing)) in this book.”

Summary.

Now that you understand How G5480 is used, and how it relates to G5482 & G1125, lets examine the second word in question: G1909 "in"-ἐπὶ (epi).

 

Worth Nothing: (1) Graphene is commonly found in pencils.

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Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G1909

 

 

 

G1909 "in"-ἐπὶ (epi).

The Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G1909 is a common Greek Preposition that can be found more than 600 times in the New Testament. This Greek Preposition is governed by three (3) cases: AccusativeGenitive, & Dative.

Some valid definitions of G1909 include: "in", "unto", "to", "at", "over", "upon", "on" & co. In the above diagram, the Greek preposition ἐπὶ epi denotes the idea of: upon, on. This is not to be confused with the Greek preposition G5228 ὑπὲρ (huper)-"above".  

Key

definition of each Greek case for: G1909

  • With the Accusative case: it implies: the downward pressure on that upon which a thing rests; active motion being suggested. (2with the accusative emphasizing motion or direction.

 

  • With the Genitive case: (1) it denotes: upon, as proceeding or springing from, and answers to the question "Where"?. (2) with the genitive emphasizing contact; in answer to "where?"

  • With the Dative case: it implies: actual superposition, as one thing resting upon another, as upon a foundation or basis which may be actual. (2with the dative emphasizing position.

**Note: the above case definitions are only for G1909

 

definition of Greek cases:

The Accusative case: The accusative case refers to the case used for a noun or pronoun that is a direct object. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

 

The Genitive case: The genitive case refers to the case used for a noun, pronoun, or adjective to show ownership. 

    E.g. "His disciples came up to show Him the buildings of the temple."

The following three (3) verses use 

G5480 & G1909 in the same verse. 

 

 

**Note: As you read the following three verses, make sure to apply the proper Greek case for other words that also use the (Genitive case) or (Accusative case) such as: "his", "the", "their", "hand/s", or "forehead/s".

 I've highlighted the Greek cases for G1909 in bold (Genitive case & Accusative case) to distinguish them from the other Greek cases (Genitive case Accusative case). 

 

Revelation 13:16

“And he causeth all, both small and great rich and poor, free and bond, to receive G5480 a mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving)  G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)Genitive case) theirGenitive case) rightGenitive case) handGenitive case), or G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)Genitive case) theirGenitive case) foreheadsGenitive case):”

Revelation 14:9

“And the third Angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving) G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)Genitive case) 

his-Genitive case) foreheadGenitive case), or G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)Accusative case) his handAccusative case),”

    Note: there is a (definite article-[the]) in the Greek Texts (TR) prior to the word: (hand), instead of the word (his). OR,

("...-[or] ἐπὶ-[in] τὴν-[the] χεῖρα-[hand] αὐτοῦ-[of him-(his)]"). 

   

The order of Greek cases is as follows: 

(". . .[-or] // ἐπὶ-[in-Accusative] // [τὴν-the-Accusative] // [χεῖρα-hand-Accusative] // [αὐτοῦ-of him-Genitive]).

 

    However, when the Greek was translated into English, the definite article [the] prior to the word (handwas omitted, and instead, the word (his) was placed before the word (hand). I bring this to your attention incase you were wondering why the word (his-Genitive case) was not labeled in the  Accusative case. Is there an error? no. This simply means that in English, it is only proper to say: "or in his hand.", as opposed to: "or in the hand of him//his.". But in doing so, the definite article [the] needs be removed.

Revelation 20:4

“And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his G5480 mark-χάραγμα (charagma)-impressed mark, engraving) G1909 upon-ἐπὶ (epi)Accusative case) their foreheadsAccusative case), or G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)Accusative case) their handsAccusative case), and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years.”

    Note: there is a (definite article-[the]) in the Greek Texts (TR) prior to the words: (foreheads) & (hands) instead of the word (their). OR,

 ("...χάραγμα-[mark] ἐπὶ-[upon] τὸ-[the] μέτωπον-[forehead] αὐτῶν-[of them] καὶ-[and] ἐπὶ-[in] τὴν-[the] χεῖρα-[hand] αὐτῶν-[of them]"). 

The order of the Greek cases is as follows:

  (". . .[χάραγμα-mark] // [ἐπὶ-upon-Accusative] // [τὸ-the-Accusative] // [μέτωπον-forehead-Accusative] // [αὐτῶν-of them-Genitive// [καὶ-and] // [ἐπὶ-in-Accusative] // [τὴν-the-Accusative] // [χεῖρα-hand-Accusative] // [αὐτῶν-of them-Genitive]...").

    Again, when the Greek was translated into English, the definite articles [the] prior to the words: (foreheads) and (handswere omitted, and instead, the word (their) was placed before the words: (foreheads) and (hands). I bring this to your attention incase you were wondering why the words (their-Genitive case) were not labeled in the Accusative case. Is there an error? no. This simply means that in English, it is only proper to say: "...mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands,...", as opposed to: "...mark upon the forehead of them, or in the hand of them,...". But in doing so, the definite article [the] needs to be removed, and their must be a switch from the singular to the plural for the words: (foreheadforeheads) and (handhands).  

    Summary.

In the above three (3) verses (Rev 13:16, Rev 14:9, & Rev 20:4) the Greek Preposition: G1909-ἐπὶ (epi) was used in two ways: "in" & "upon". 

 

The word "in" was governed by two (2) cases:

with:

Genitive case-(Rev 13:16, Rev 14:9, & Rev 20:4). 

with:

Accusative case-(Rev 14:9, & Rev 20:4).

 

The word "uponwas governed by one (1) case:

with:

Accusative case-(Rev 20:4).    

 

Both are correct. The proper use of each Greek case is determined by the syntax of the text. What is important here, is to understand the definition and application of G1909 in conjunction with each Greek case. If you noticed, both the (Genitive case) & (Accusative case) were used interchangeably for the words: (hand/s) & (forehead/s). What determined the proper use of each Greek case was based on how the sentence was worded. 

In the English language, the English word "in" can easily be mistaken for the Greek Preposition: G1722 ἐν (en), which has multiple uses, and among them is the English word: "in". More on this below.

Worth Noting: The words: "on" & "upon" best bring out the definition of the Greek Preposition ἐπὶ (epi). Consider the word "upon", it is made up of two word; "up" and "on", denoting superficiality. And yes, G1909 can also be used: of time, of place, of contact, of motion and direction, & co. However, the emphasis here is that of place, answering to the question: "Where?"      

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Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Number: G1722

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Now,

In the above diagrams, you can appreciate the difference

between the Greek Prepositions:

 (ἐπὶ (epi)-G1909) & (ἐν (en)-G1722); both are highlighted in yellow.

G1722 is governed by one (1) case, the Dative. Now to give you an idea of how G1722 can be used. Compare the following verses:

 

definition of the Dative case for: G1772

  • With the Dative case: ἐν (en) only takes the Dative, a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state). It denotes: being or remaining within, with the primary idea of rest and continuance. it has regard to place and space. It also denotes continuance in time. with the plural it means "among". This Preposition is common throughout the New Testament, it is used more than two thousand times.

 

With the emphasis; of place / location:

 

  • Preposition with the dative; the primary idea is within, in, withinness, denoting static position or time, but the many and varied uses can be determined only by the context; the chief categories of usage are as follows: 

  • (1of place; (a) denoting a position within boundaries in, within.

  • A position defined as being within certain limits- 'inside, within, in'

  • I. Locally; 1. of place proper; a. in the interior of some whole; within the limits of some space:

Matthew 1:20

“But while he thought on these things, behold, the Angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived G1772 in-ἐν (en) Dative case) her, is of the holy Ghost.”

Matthew 5:15

“Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick, and it giveth light unto all that are G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) the house.”

Matthew 14:3

“For Herod had laid hold on John, and bound him, and put him G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) prison for Herodias' sake, his brother Philip's wife.”

Acts 5:42

“And daily G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) the Temple, and in every house, they ceased not to teach and preach Jesus Christ.”

Romans 8:10

“And if Christ be G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) you, the body is dead because of sin: but the spirit is life, because of righteousness.”

1 Corinthians 6:19

“What, know ye not that your body is the Temple of the holy Ghost which is G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?”

Luke 7:37

“And, behold, a woman G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) the city which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment,”

 

 

Summary.

In the above seven (7) verses, the common definition for the Greek preposition G1772 ἐν (en) is that of place (e.g. 'inside, within, in'). And yes, this preposition can also be use: (1of time; (a) denoting a point of time for an event; (2of cause or reason; (a) denoting means or instrument; and various other uses. However, my objective is to make a clear distinction between (ἐπὶ (epi)-G1909) & (ἐν (en)-G1722) in regards to place/location. More on this below.

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Strong's Exhaustive Concordance Numbers: G1909 G1722

The following examples use:

 (ἐπὶ (epi)-G1909) & (ἐν (en)-G1722in the same verse,

with the emphasis on place/location:

Matthew 5:15

“Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but G1909 on-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, over—Accusative case) a candlestick, and it giveth light unto all that are G1772 in-ἐν (en)-in—Dative case) the house.”

Matthew 16:19

“And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind G1909 on-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, over—Genitive case) earth, shall be bound G1772 in-ἐν (en)Dative case) heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose G1909 on-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, over—Genitive case) earth, shall be loosed G1772 in-ἐν (en)-inDative case) heaven.”

Matthew 23:9

“And call no man your father G1909 upon-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, over—Genitive case) the earth: for one is your father which is G1772 in-ἐν (en)-inDative case) heaven.”

Matthew 6:10

“Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, G1909 in-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, overGenitive case) earth, as it is G1772 in-ἐν (en)-inDative case) heaven.”

Matthew 18:6

“But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged G1909 about-ἐπὶ (epi)-on, upon, over—Accusative case) his neck, and that he were drowned G1772 in-ἐν (en)-inDative case) the depth of the Sea.”

Summary.

I hope you were able to distinguish the difference between G1909 & G1772 with respect to place/locationAnd how also G1909 can be expressed in different words (e.g. "on", "in", "upon", "about"). However, even though G1909 uses the English word "in" for Matthew 6:10, it should not be assumed that it is of equal definition to G1772

Worth Nothing: (1) English words don't always bring out the most accurate definition of its Greek equivalent. Take for example the word: "for". This word can be used as retrospective or